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Things Your Senior Dog Would Like to Tell You

Updated: Dec 18, 2019

adapted from https://olddoghaven.org/7-things-your-senior-dog-would-like-to-tell-you/


‘I can’t see as well anymore. I can’t hear as well either.’

If you think your dog is starting to ignore you, you may actually find that he simply doesn’t hear you calling, or he can’t see the ball you threw in what you thought was plain sight. Often, owners don’t notice the signs that a dog is losing his sight or hearing until the loss is severe. One of the signs may initially look like aggression — if a person comes up and touches the dog without the dog noticing the approach, the dog may react out of defensive surprise. This could also be because the touch caused pain in arthritic or sensitive areas.


In the case of hearing loss, one of the ways you can prepare for a smooth transition to deafness is to start training with hand signals early. When your dog knows hand signals well, it won’t matter as much that he can’t hear what you’re asking of him. And many dogs who are hard of hearing can still detect vibration, so you can get your dog’s attention by using hand claps, knocking on a hard surface or some other noise-making strategy.


Vision loss is another problem with subtle signs. If your dog becomes more clumsy, can’t find food or water dishes, doesn’t want to move around as much, or is easily startled, a loss of vision could be the culprit. If your vet determines that the behavior changes are indeed due to weakening vision, there are some work-arounds that might help your dog. The ASPCA recommends clearing clutter from the floor, marking different rooms with different scents or with differently textured rugs so your dog recognizes which room he’s in by smell or touch, blocking off dangerous areas such as pools, and keeping familiar things like furniture and food and water dishes in the same place.


‘I get cold more easily now.’

There’s a reason why older dogs like warm cozy beds — it’s not as easy to regulate body temperature. A dog who could handle hanging outside all day on a chilly day will likely need a sweater when out and a bit more time inside with a bed close to the heater. Helping your dog keep his body temperature up will help minimize joint and muscle stiffness, and even help him stave off illnesses since his body won’t be focused entirely on staying warm.

If your dog needs a little extra help staying warm, there are of course a huge array of sweaters for when your dog is outside. When indoors, you can help by putting the dog’s bed close to a heat source.


I can’t move as well as I used to because my joints hurt.’

Arthritis and joint pain are common problems for aging dogs. Whether it’s an old injury that begins to flare up more often or arthritis that continues to worsen, joint pain can cause a number of problems for an older dog from difficulty getting into the car or down the stairs to being able to move around in cold weather.


When joint pain sets in, anti-inflammatory pain relievers prescribed by a vet could be helpful. You can also provide ramps where a dog needs to climb stairs, take shorter but more frequent walks, provide opportunities to swim or have other non-impactful exercise, provide him with an orthopedic bed and elevated food and water dishes, and even simple measures like not calling him to come to you when he’s lying down unless it’s necessary.


‘I get confused sometimes and may forget some of our old rules.’

A loss of cognitive ability is common with aging. Your dog may forget simple things like how to navigate around an obstacle or even get lost in areas he’s not familiar with or not recognize people he knows. He may have a harder time performing tasks or learning new tricks. In fact, he may forget behaviors he’s known for a long time such as being house trained. Bathroom accidents may become more common. No matter what, if your dog starts to act strangely or has behavior changes, have him checked out by a vet to be sure of the cause, which could be more than simply aging. But if it does come down to getting older, you can help your dog with medications and supplements as well as simply being more patient with him and helping him when he gets confused or lost.



I need a little extra care in grooming these days.’

Older dogs often experience changes in skin, coat and even their nails. Their skin can become dry and their coat more coarse. A supplement of coconut or salmon oil with meals can go a long way to solving the problem. But the dog’s skin can also become more thin, so injury may be more likely. It’s important to take extra care when the dog is playing or out on a hiking trail that he isn’t hurt. Meanwhile the dog’s nails can become brittle. Your dog will need more frequent nail trimmings since he isn’t filing down his nails through activities, so it’s important to take extra care with pedicures.

Because an older dog might not be as likely or as able to do his own grooming, you may need to increase how many times a week you brush out his coat and help him to stay clean. It’s a great opportunity to bond with one another, as well as a chance for you to check for any new lumps, bumps or pains your dog may be having that might need to be checked out.

There are many more things to keep an eye out for as your dog ages, including good dental care to avoid gum disease, a diet that fulfills all of his unique nutritional needs, and watching for other common issues of aging from liver disease to diabetes to more difficulty fighting off illnesses. Though it may sound like a lot of work to care for your dog as he hits the senior years, such devotion has its own special rewards, including knowing that you’ve done everything you can for a companion that has been dependent on you from day one.


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